Horse Jumping

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The beauty of horse and rider flying through the air with effortless ease is a sight to behold. The joining of two minds, two hearts and two bodies represents a unique opportunity for artistic partnership that is rarely seen between animals and humans. If you think this sounds like fun, then Debbie has much to offer you with her years of passionate experience.

What is Horse Jumping?

“Show jumping, also known as “stadium jumping”, “open jumping”, or “jumpers”, is a member of a family of English riding equestrian events that also includes dressage, eventing, hunters, and equitation. Jumping classes are commonly seen at horse shows throughout the world, including the Olympics. Sometimes shows are limited exclusively to jumpers, sometimes jumper classes are offered in conjunction with other English-style events, and sometimes show jumping is but one division of very large, all-breed competitions that include a very wide variety of disciplines. Jumping classes may be governed by various national horse show sanctioning organizations, such as the United States Equestrian Federation in the USA. International competitions are governed by the rules of the International Federation for Equestrian Sports.” (Show Jumping – Wikipedia).

What does Horse Jumping look like?

Debbie Miller on Quilty

Debbie Miller on Quilty jumping a Hogsback

Debbie Miller on Gazelle

Debbie Miller on Gazelle jumping a Hogsback

Debbie Miller on Gazelle jumping barrels with a pole on top.

 

 

 

 

Jenny Galindo showing "Amy" an Appy mare.

A former student, Jenny Galindo showing “Amy” an Appy mare.

Debbie Jumping with Star

Debbie Miller riding “Star” her chestnut quarter horse in a 6-bar gymnastic competition. L.A. California.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How can Debbie help me with my Horse Jumping skills?

Debbie’s years of experience has enabled her to identify every aspect of the jumping process, coach students on ways to improve their skills and further the Horse Jumping art. Here are a few examples,

The rider has their eyes up, but has incorrectly placed their hands on the horse's neck and close together.

The rider has their eyes up, but has incorrectly placed their hands on the horse’s neck and close together.

The rider has a proper posture, and the horse is making good use of its head and neck. Unfortunately it is to close, twisting and diving over the jump.

The rider has a proper posture, and the horse is making good use of its head and neck. Unfortunately it is to close, twisting and diving over the jump.

The rider correctly has their heels down and light contact with the reigns. Unfortunately the rider also has their toes out, reigns in their fingers, looking down, to far out of the saddle, and ahead of the horse. The horse is standing back with good use of the head and neck, with its ears up and enjoying the jump. The horse incorrectly does not have its front legs tucked up correctly.

The rider correctly has their heels down and light contact with the reigns. Unfortunately the rider also has their toes out, reigns in their fingers, looking down, to far out of the saddle, and ahead of the horse.
The horse is standing back with good use of the head and neck, with its ears up and enjoying the jump. The horse incorrectly does not have its front legs tucked up correctly.

The rider correctly has their eyes up, light contact, heels down, with their weight in their stirrups and knees. The rider incorrectly has their toes out, legs shoud be back, and they are also to far down on the neck with their hands to high. The horse correctly has its ears up, standing back (enjoying), and making good use of its head and neck. Unfortunately it's not well tucked up, and dropping one foot.

The rider correctly has their eyes up, light contact, heels down, with their weight in their stirrups and knees. The rider incorrectly has their toes out, legs shoud be back, and they are also to far down on the neck with their hands to high. 
The horse correctly has its ears up, standing back (enjoying), and making good use of its head and neck. Unfortunately it’s not well tucked up, and dropping one foot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The rider correctly has light contact that is not interfering with the horse while maintaining their weight in the stirrups and heals down. The rider unfortunately is also looking down, toes out, hands to high, and not straight on approach. The horse is performing the jump well, balanced with relaxed attitude. Unfortunately it is also jumping to high for this size fence and not tucked up correctly.

The rider correctly has light contact that is not interfering with the horse while maintaining their weight in the stirrups and heals down. The rider unfortunately is also looking down, toes out, hands to high, and not straight on approach.
The horse is performing the jump well, balanced with a relaxed attitude. Unfortunately it is also jumping to high for this size fence and not tucked up correctly.

The rider has a straight approach with light contact, looking up, heels down, and not interfering with the horse's movements. The rider also has their wrist turned, toes out, hands to high, legets not far enough back. The horse is standing back, well balanced, with correct use of the head, body, and legs. The horse is also jumping a little to high for this fence.

The rider has a straight approach with light contact, looking up, heels down, and not interfering with the horse’s movements. The rider also has their wrist turned, toes out, hands to high, legets not far enough back.
The horse is standing back, well balanced, with correct use of the head, body, and legs. The horse is also jumping a little to high for this fence.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For a fresh dose of excitement and fun give Debbie Miller a call at (520) 686-0048 to begin your journey of partnership with one of the most beautiful and powerful animals on earth.

Students